Resume Tips for the Uninitiated: Part 3

Welcome to part three of my series of short posts featuring helpful tips for those not accustomed to writing resumes. For this instalment, I thought I would address an issue I frequently encountered when reviewing the resumes of college students.

Several times, I noticed that students had included a “Hobbies” section on the resume. There are differing opinions on the use of such a section, so I thought I would share my view on it.

Personally, I do not feel that hobbies should be included on a resume. I understand that when an applicant does not have a lot of work experience to highlight, they might want to include some hobbies to fill out the resume. They likely think it shows that they are a well-rounded individual. There’s nothing wrong with this way of thinking necessarily; it’s more a case of using the resume to best showcase what you have to offer an employer.

For this reason, I recommend using the space to share information about volunteering, special projects worked on, or clubs you belong to. Each of these things can help position you as a fit for the job, in a more straightforward way than including hobbies probably could.

The exception I sometimes made to this, was to include hobbies only if they directly relate to the job being applied for. For example, video production as a hobby might be relevant to an event planning role, particularly if live streaming is part of the events or conferences the successful applicant would be planning.

In the end, you as the applicant need to ensure that each and every piece of information listed on the resume supports the employment objective and job being sought. You are encouraged to use your best judgment to determine whether including hobbies achieves this goal.

What do you think readers? Would you include hobbies on a resume? Why or why not?

 

Resume Tips for the Uninitiated: Part 1

Resume writing is a life skill, but it can be a difficult one to learn. Even experienced workers can struggle with crafting an effective resume, but knowing how to do so is empowering. Young people, particularly teenagers and those just starting to think about the job search, can find it especially hard to put together a resume, but it is certainly possible.

That said, in this post I will share the first of a series of tips on how to write your first resume.

  • Start early. It is very stressful when you find a job opportunity or promising volunteer role, but you have no resume. Having to write it when under pressure can make it harder to do. It is best to start gathering the information for the resume long before it has to be submitted. The beginning of a new school year is an ideal time for teenagers to start this task.

Encourage your teenager to start keeping track of any courses they have taken, as well as clubs, special projects, or volunteer work they have participated in, and the relevant dates associated with each. These items make up the bones of a good resume, and if they are noted as they arise, it’s easier to recall the necessary details when it comes time to write the actual resume.

Your teenager can also keep a physical file of achievements, such as certificates, ribbons and school evaluations, all of which might be relevant when it comes to assembling an effective resume.

Stay tuned for more resume tips for the uninitiated in upcoming posts!

A Hard Look at Soft Skill Development

Previously, I wrote about the fact that our high schools are not doing a good enough job of helping students develop the soft skills they will need to succeed in the workplace. I also noted that many HR professionals believe that making some changes to existing high school curriculum, and providing more experiential learning opportunities (i.e. volunteering or co-op), could help to address this problem. However, I wondered how students could even obtain such positions, if soft skills are important in the search for them.

I would first suggest that we start when children are young. All children can be taught how to communicate clearly,  the importance of being on time to appointments, and how to be courteous and a good team player. Parents and teachers can all play a part in teaching young people these important soft skills, just by working them into every day interactions. It needn’t be a difficult process, and it would go a long way to ensuring students’ success, not just in the workplace, but in life in general.

I think for too long now, students have been coddled and treated with kid gloves, in the misguided belief that this will preserve their self-esteem. I noted in the previous post how many times, students are not held accountable for turning in schoolwork late, or for repeatedly being late to class. By allowing them to get away with such behaviours, we miss out on the chance to help them develop useful soft skills, and to become more responsible people, and thus, more valuable workers.

Once students are accustomed to using soft skills in their school life and at home, they will be better positioned to obtain volunteering and co-op positions when they reach high school age. Their interviews will have a greater chance of going smoothly, since they will be better able to communicate and interact with the decision makers they will encounter. This strategy has the best chance of success if we start teaching our children from an early age, and not leaving it until it might be too late.

What do you all think? What is your take on the soft skills question? I’d love to hear from you!

The Problem with Soft Skills

According to a survey from the Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA) in Toronto, our high schools are not adequately preparing students for the workplace; in fact, 42% of respondents reported that these young people are lacking the necessary soft skills required for entry-level work.

Perhaps before I go any further with this, I should define what exactly hard and soft skills are, as some people are not clear on the difference. Hard skills are those that are required to perform a job successfully; these skills are often included in the requirements for a job, and are those that can be acquired through formal education and training programs. Examples of hard skills are web design, accounting, typing and mathematics. Soft skills on the other hand, are attributes and personality traits that are not quantifiable like hard skills are. Soft skills include things like leadership, empathy, and communication, all things which are very hard to teach in a formal setting. Both hard and soft skills are required for success in the workplace, which is why this survey is so interesting.

According to the results, the top three soft skills that are lacking are problem-solving (cited by 62% of respondents), attention to detail (cited by 56%), and interpersonal / teamwork skills (48% of respondents chose this). Where this becomes really interesting however, is in the fact that 70.7% of respondents felt that changes to high school curriculum could help students gain the skills they are currently lacking. But, I just noted above that soft skills are very difficult to teach in a formal educational setting. How then, can this be reconciled?

I would suggest that part of the reason for the lack of soft skills stems from the lowering of standards that is becoming more prevalent in our schools. I hear more and more that secondary students are often not held accountable for turning work in on time, and that communication and writing standards are on the decline, with text speak and poor grammar becoming more common. In my own work with college students,  I witnessed first-hand the lack of soft skills every day. I was an employment advisor, who met one-on-one with students to provide them with help on job search skills and resume writing. I can’t even count how many times students would not show up for their appointments, and never let me know they would not be in, or who could not communicate to me what their goals were or what kind of work they were interested in. In many cases, I also noticed a lack of initiative and a failure to take responsibility for the students’ own learning. All of these things speak to the problem with soft skills that I have been discussing.

Whatever the reason for the missing skills, the HRPA did suggest a possible solution to the problem. Respondents overwhelmingly felt that if schools provided more opportunities for experiential learning, the issue might be improved. Examples of experiential learning include co-ops and volunteer experiences.

But, herein lies a conundrum. How can a student obtain one of these positions to improve their soft skills, when soft skills are necessary to land the opportunity in the first place? Hmm. Seems like a good topic to explore in a future blog post. Stay tuned for my thoughts!

*See the survey at http://www.hrreporter.com/recruitment-and-retention/33644-high-schools-failing-to-provide-foundational-soft-skills-survey

 

 

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs

After previously writing about university as preparation for the real world, and the importance of self-awareness for job seekers, I thought it might be a good idea to focus on how exactly young people can learn what jobs exist, and what they actually entail. Given the sheer number of possibilities out there, it would be impossible to learn about every single one; still, with a sense of their interests and skills, any teenager can start to explore options that might be a good fit.

The reason I suggest starting when your child is a teenager, is that many people select jobs and careers while only having a vague sense of what they actually involve. This can lead to a poor fit, which in turn can lead to frequently switching jobs and careers and never really getting established in anything. Exploring possibilities earlier on can help to clarify what the teen is really interested in, and help them to follow a more connected path.

So how can teenagers begin to explore their career possibilities? There are three main ways I would suggest:

  1. Informational interviews
  2. Job shadowing
  3. Volunteering

Though I could write a great deal here about the ins and outs of each method, I think I might save that for future posts. For now, I want to point out the benefits of using any or all of these methods to explore career options.

  • Any of these methods provides the young person with a healthy dose of reality. Too many of us choose our professions without ever really knowing exactly what the ins and outs of the profession are. Job shadowing allows the shadower to see up close what a person does every day in their job. The other two methods I’ve mentioned provide a similar insider’s view of a particular job, and can be very helpful in determining whether perception lives up to reality when it comes to a given job.
  • Once a teenager has an idea of his or her particular skills, interests, and talents, the three exploration methods can help them to see if a particular job is in line with those qualities. It would certainly be helpful to discover beforehand if a job plays to the teen’s strengths, or if it involves a high proportion of skills or abilities that they lack or have no desire to develop.
  • Exploring the realities of different jobs can help a young person begin to grasp the idea of career paths. This means seeing how different jobs might be related, and how one can move between different jobs that use similar skill sets, so as not to have to start at square one each time they decide to make a job change. Again, talking to actual people who do various jobs can be immensely helpful in this regard.
  • One benefit that might not be immediately evident, is the fact that valuable contacts and mentors can be acquired from engaging in informational interviews, job shadowing or volunteering. Often, relationships are formed that can be very helpful when one is starting in their own career.  It can be very useful to have people to turn to to ask for advice when faced with career dilemmas or important decisions. We all need help from time to time, after all. Forming these contacts early on can only be beneficial.

As you can see, there are many ways to start learning about the world of jobs, and each can help a young person in a myriad of ways. The key is starting early, and being open to learning and enjoying the process.